Colours of Pompeii

COLOUR OF THE MONTH: blue

In Pompeji:

Blue was imported to Pompeii from Egypt. In keeping with its origins, it was originally called ‘Egyptian blue’, but was later known as ‘Pompeian blue’. It was an absolute luxury – and had been used to decorate walls in ancient Egypt since at least 2,500 B.C. Even then, prices were determined by supply and demand; in Pompeii, blue was so highly sought after that its price sometimes even surpassed that of the astronomically expensive purple.

IN THE MODERN AGE:

Blue is generally associated with calm, reliability and loyalty (‘true blue’), which is one of the reasons why it is so popular in the professional and political worlds. At the swearing-in ceremony of Germany’s government ministers in March 2018, three female ministers wore outfits in resplendent blue (two of which were virtually identical, although this was unplanned). Globally, blue is by far the most popular colour.

IN THE HOME:

Blue comes across as calm, sober and reserved. It’s the cool big sister of dominant red. Blue is content to be in the background. It makes rooms seem larger and more expansive than they really are. It guides the viewer’s gaze into the distance, thus creating a sense of infinity. It’s a colour that soothes, creates a certain openness and thus nurtures creativity. It reminds us of the sky and sea and makes some of us feel a little melancholy; otherwise, Pablo Picasso would probably never have had a Blue Period. Entire rooms can be painted in lighter shades of blue; the richer the blue, the more it lends itself to subtle colour touches.

Colours of Pompeii

COLOUR OF THE MONTH: blue

In Pompeji:

Blue was imported to Pompeii from Egypt. In keeping with its origins, it was originally called ‘Egyptian blue’, but was later known as ‘Pompeian blue’. It was an absolute luxury – and had been used to decorate walls in ancient Egypt since at least 2,500 B.C. Even then, prices were determined by supply and demand; in Pompeii, blue was so highly sought after that its price sometimes even surpassed that of the astronomically expensive purple.

IN THE MODERN AGE:

Blue is generally associated with calm, reliability and loyalty (‘true blue’), which is one of the reasons why it is so popular in the professional and political worlds. At the swearing-in ceremony of Germany’s government ministers in March 2018, three female ministers wore outfits in resplendent blue (two of which were virtually identical, although this was unplanned). Globally, blue is by far the most popular colour.

IN THE HOME:

Blue comes across as calm, sober and reserved. It’s the cool big sister of dominant red. Blue is content to be in the background. It makes rooms seem larger and more expansive than they really are. It guides the viewer’s gaze into the distance, thus creating a sense of infinity. It’s a colour that soothes, creates a certain openness and thus nurtures creativity. It reminds us of the sky and sea and makes some of us feel a little melancholy; otherwise, Pablo Picasso would probably never have had a Blue Period. Entire rooms can be painted in lighter shades of blue; the richer the blue, the more it lends itself to subtle colour touches.

Blue

Acilius

Trebius

Caecilia

Ausonius

WANT TO KNOW MORE?

OUR COLOURS ARE AVAILABLE FROM SELECTED RETAILERS AND PREMIUM FURNITURE STORES.

WANT TO KNOW MORE? OUR COLOURS ARE AVAILABLE FROM SELECTED RETAILERS AND PREMIUM FURNITURE STORES.

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PHAROS S. à r.l.
9 rue du Laboratoire
L-1911 Luxemburg

T. +49 21 02 9409 47
info@pharos-colours.lu

Colours of Pompeii is a brand of premium wall paints. The range is inspired by the colours that one would once have seen on a stroll through Pompeii. Each colour is timeless and modern – and can be combined in a variety of ways.